Expanded Composition Fall Semester

ENG 100E/101E: COMPOSITION I-EXPANDED

The University of Southern Mississippi

Fall 2012

THE EXPANDED COMPOSITION PROGRAM

Comp I-Expanded is a two-semester sequence of classes linked through a common instructor—for both semesters, students usually have the same teacher, work with the same group of students, and often even have the same classroom. We designed this program to help build a real writing community, as everyone has an entire year to work together to develop critical writing and reading strategies that will be crucial throughout their academic careers.  Upon completion of the first semester of ENG 100E, students will receive a traditional letter grade.  However, because we want to place emphasis on continuity between the two semesters, students will conference with instructors at the beginning of the spring semester to discuss their grades from the fall semester and the role their previous essays will play in the 101 section of the course.  In addition, the students’ final portfolios will include revisions of their work from both semesters.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Composition I-Expanded aims to introduce students to the strategies, tools and resources necessary to become successful communicators in a wide range of academic, professional, and public settings. Four assumptions are fundamental to this work:

1)       writing is a form of social interaction. Thus, successful writers must not only consider their audiences and the contexts in which they write, but the personal, social and political implications of writing (or not writing) more generally;

2)       the organization of modern society requires that people inhabit and move among several  discourse communities every day. Because each discourse community has its own rules and assumptions (often unstated) about what can be said, by whom, when, and how, becoming an effective communicator means learning to recognize, analyze, and negotiate the differing expectations of these communities;

3)       writing and thinking are intimately connected activities. Becoming a successful communicator means not only learning how to think carefully through writing, but to reflect critically about writing, both one’s own and the work of others. Thus, honest self-reflection and a thorough understanding of what it means to truly revise are essential aspects of learning to write effectively;

4)       genres are types of writing that have emerged over time to address recurring situations. Each genre has particular features, conventions and structures for organizing and presenting information. Being an effective writer requires not only learning how to analyze one’s rhetorical situation and use such conventional forms strategically, but evaluating the costs and benefits of violating such conventions, and when desired, how to go about doing so.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

USM’s Composition Program has identified specific learning outcomes for each of its first-year writing courses.  At the completion of ENG 101, students will be able to:

  • See that writing is a form of social interaction
  • Analyze rhetorical situations and make effective choices based on audience and context
  • Responsibly synthesize material from a variety of sources
  • Make claims and support them with appropriate evidence
  • Use writing to critically explore, explain, evaluate and reflect on their experiences and those of others
  • Understand and effectively use a range of genres/forms
  • Use conventions of expression appropriate to situation and audience
  • Effectively revise and provide substantive feedback to others on their writing
  • Articulate a revision strategy based on an understanding of their own writing processes
  • Recognize the importance of technology in research, writing, and other forms of social interaction

REQUIRED MATERIALS

  • Mauk, John and John Metz. The Composition of Everyday Life: A Guide to Writing, 3rd Ed.  Boston: Wadsworth/Cengage, 2010
  • A 3-ring binder and loose leaf paper
  • Folders for turning in projects
  • Regular access to Blackboard to download and print supplemental readings from the course website

RECOMMENDED MATERIALS

  • Lunsford, Andrea.  The Everyday Writer, 4th Ed. New York: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2010

REQUIREMENTS

In order to pass both semesters of our expanded composition program, you must satisfactorily complete all of the following:

  • complete all six major writing projects, each to be submitted in a folder with any rough drafts, workshop notes and/or supporting research materials relevant to the project;
  • complete the Final Revision and Portfolio/Self-Evaluation Projects, to be submitted at the end of the fall and spring semesters (in lieu of final exams);
  • submit all required writing sketches required throughout the year.
  • maintain a response log, consisting of all in-class and informal writing assignments given as homework, which will be collected and evaluated periodically over the course of the semesters;
  • complete all reading assignments and homework; actively participate in class discussions and workshops, and maintain regular classroom attendance.
  • meet with instructor for all required individual conferences.
  • utilize USM’s Writing Center and Speaking Center as directed by instructor.

ONLINE MATERIAL

In addition to readings in the assigned textbooks, a number of required resources and materials will only be available online through Blackboard/WebCT. You can log into the online component of this course by first going to http://southernmiss.blackboard.com, and then following the log-in instructions. You will need to have your EMPLID and password (the same information you use to access SOAR and register for classes.) If you have any questions or run into difficulty accessing the Blackboard/WebCT material for this course, please call the iTech Helpdesk at 601-266-4357, or e-mail them at helpdesk@usm.edu. You can also get help as well as specific instructions on how to use various components of Blackboard/WebCT by visiting http://www.usm.edu/lec/des/students/blackboard_student_tutorials.php,

COURSE POLICIES

GRADES

Writing and thinking are complex processes that take time to develop. Thus, your overall grade for the first semester of this program is as dependent on how much your writing improves over the course of the semester, your demonstrated commitment to learning and support of your peers, the careful completion of homework and class assignments, and your own assessment of your strengths and progress, as any strict calculation of paper grades. Indeed, much of your final grade for this course will be determined by your participation in the writing community we are creating.  In addition, remember that the papers you write for this section of the course will be revisited in the spring semester of ENG 101E. We will talk individually about your fall semester grades, so you will know exactly where you stand starting your spring semester.  The following should serve as only a guide to how grading for the first semester of this class will be approached:

FALL SEMESTER

Project One: Personal Essay/Learning Autobiography (10 pts)

A brief paper (750-1000 words) in which you will analyze and reflect on a significant learning moment in your life in a way that is meaningful for someone else.  Due Wednesday, September 19.

Project Two: Profile (15 pts)

A paper (1000-1500 words) in which you will interview and profile a member of a specific community that interests you.  Due Friday, October 19.

Project Three: Media Image Analysis (20 pts)

A longer paper (1000 – 1500 words) in which you will analyze and explore an advertisement and offer a defense of your interpretation of the ad.  Due Monday, November 19.

Self-Evaluation/Revision Project (15 pts)

One of the three projects, systematically and thoroughly revised; as well as completion of the first-semester, self-evaluation assignment.  Due during final exam period.

Course Journal/Writing Sketches (10 pts)

A collection of in-class and homework assignments that encourage you to reflect on writing and the course material. Individual entries will not be graded, and in-class writing cannot be made up in the event of an absence.  Writing Sketches are brief (300-500 words) drafts of your most promising materials that will be submitted for response and feedback.

Class Participation (30 pts)

Your contributions to class-discussions; your work as part of a facilitation group; participation in peer review workshops; quizzes; Writing and Speaking Center attendance; etc.

Note: For program assessment purposes, some final portfolios may be randomly selected for institutional review at the conclusion of the spring semester. In such cases, portfolios will be collected anonymously from among all available sections of Expanded Composition I. This review is intended solely to improve the quality of the curriculum, and will not affect your grade in any way.

PREPARATION

In addition to completing reading and writing assignments, preparing for class means being ready to discuss and intelligently question issues raised by the material. This does not mean, however, that you must master the material. On the contrary, it is perfectly reasonable that you may be confused by some readings the first time we encounter them. But in such cases you should be prepared to discuss what you specifically found puzzling, aggravating, thought-provoking, engaging or difficult about the assignment. In other words, if you feel you have nothing to state about a piece of writing, actively develop a list of questions about it. Remember, much of your grade in this course will be determined by how much you improve, so there’s really no such thing as a stupid question, provided that you ask it in the spirit of honest inquiry.

ATTENDANCE

The framework of this course – with its emphasis on class discussion and group work – demands that you attend class regularly. Failure to complete in-class work, such as peer reviews, in-class writing assignments, and group meetings will result in the lowering of your grade. Indeed, no in-class activities (including quizzes) may be made up due to tardiness or absence, and students who accumulate more than three unexcused absences over the course of the semester will automatically have their final grades lowered. More than six absences in a semester will result in your failing the course (Note: You are responsible for keeping track of your own absences).

TARDY POLICY

You will be marked tardy if you arrive more than five minutes after the beginning of class. After fifteen minutes, you will be counted absent for the day. Three tardies and/or early departures from class equal one absence.

LATE WORK

Late work will only be accepted if you can demonstrate that you have encountered a valid obstacle before the deadline (i.e., that you’ve been working on the project in good faith, but have run into some problems). If you feel you may be unable to complete an assignment on time, you should contact me as soon as possible, but no later than two days before the due date. After reviewing all the work you’ve done on the assignment, we will set a new deadline together. In all other cases, late work will automatically be docked one letter grade per day past the deadline, beginning the day the assignment was due.

Note: Unless specified otherwise, no papers submitted electronically will be accepted, and work magically appearing in my mailbox without a prior agreement with me will also be considered late.

ELECTRONICS POLICY:

It is important to me that we maintain a positive, engaging, and professional atmosphere in the classroom. Cell phones must be on silent or turned off during class (as opposed to being set on vibrate, which everyone can still hear). Please DO NOT check or send text messages or emails; if you do so, you WILL GET A ZERO for participation points and, in certain cases, may be asked to leave class and take an absence for the day. If you have an emergency and must leave your phone on, please tell me before class. All other electronic devices (including cell phones and music devices) should be turned off and/or silenced before coming to class; please remove any earpieces as well. You may bring your laptop or e-reader to class in order to view the PDF reading assignments. Electronic devices should remain in your bag unless you make prior arrangements; if you want to use such devices you must read and sign the “Electronics Agreement” at the end of the syllabus and return it to me before you use your device

PLAGIARISM

All members of the academic community at the University of Southern Mississippi are expected to take responsibility for academic honesty and integrity. Therefore, it is very important that you understand and follow the academic community’s rules about plagiarism. Plagiarism is the unauthorized or unacknowledged use of another person’s academic or scholarly work. Done on purpose, it is theft or fraud. It is no less serious when done accidentally, because learning these rules is fundamental to your success in academic writing.The penalties for plagiarism can include being failed for the course and in some cases even expulsion from the university. If you have any doubts as to what constitutes plagiarism, please refer to your student handbook for USM policies on Academic Honesty, or come talk to me.

ADA NOTICE

The University of Southern Mississippi is committed to providing equal access to its programs, services and activities for people with disabilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act requires that reasonable accommodations be provided for students with physical, sensory, cognitive, systemic, learning, and psychiatric disabilities. If you feel you may need accommodations in this or any class, please contact the Office of Disability Services (118 College Dr. #8586, Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001) at 601-266-5024 (Telephone), 601-266-6837 (TTY), or 601-266-6035 (FAX).

THE WRITING CENTER

The Writing Center is a free program available to all student writers at the University of Southern Mississippi. It offers one-on-one help with any kind of writing project, at any stage of the writing process. The Writing Center is located in Cook Library 112.  The Writing Center will play an important role in the design of this course.  For more information, and hours of operation, you may contact The Writing Center at 601-266-4821.

THE SPEAKING CENTER

The University of Southern Mississippi offers a Speaking Center, with consultations available at no cost to all students, faculty, and staff.  The center is available for advice on all types of oral communication—formal individual presentations, group presentations, class discussion, class debates, interviews, campus speeches, etc.  Tutors at the Speaking Center will work with you on brainstorming, organizing and outlining, editing and revising, and practicing delivery.  The center also offers several practice rooms for recording presentations and practicing with delivery aids (PowerPoint and internet access are available).  Visit the center in Cook Library 117, call the center at 601-266-4965, or visit the web site at www.usm.edu/speakingcenter.

STUDENT COUNSELING SERVICES

Student Counseling Services provide quality services to Southern Miss students by promoting sound mental health and the coping skills necessary for successful pursuit of their educational and life goals. As mental health professionals, we work in a spirit of collaboration within the Division of Student Affairs to support individual responsibility, personal growth, and wellness of all members of the student body. The counseling center is located at 200 Kennard Washington Hall. You can reach them by phone at 601-266-4829 or visit their website: http://www.usm.edu/student-counseling-services.

FALL 2012 IMPORTANT DATES*

Labor Day Holiday: Monday, September 3

Last Day to Drop Full-Semester Classes without Financial Penalty: Wednesday, September 5

Last Day to Drop Full-Semester Classes without Academic Penalty: Wednesday, October 3

Fall Break: Thursday, October 11 – Friday, October 12

Last Day to Process an Add/Drop/Withdraw Form: Tuesday, November 20

Thanksgiving Holidays: Wednesday, November 21 – Friday, November 23

Last Day of Classes: Friday, December 7

 Course Schedule

Note: Course assignments, readings, and project due dates are subject to change.

CEL = The Composition of Everyday Life

BB = Blackboard

RL = Response Log

Week One

W 08/22 Introduction to the course; Student introductions; Review syllabus
F 08/24 In-class diagnostic essay

HW:

Reading: CEL Ch. 1 pp. 4 – 25

Week Two

M 08/27 Discuss “Inventing Ideas”; Introduce Project One

HW:

Reading: CEL Ch. 2 pp. 28 – 29Sedaris, “Me Talk Pretty One Day” (BB reading)

 

Writing: RL 1: on BB, respond to the questions posted on the “Me Talk Pretty One Day” discussion board. Respond to at least one other person’s post.
W 08/29 Discuss “Me Talk Pretty One Day” and Ch. 2; In-class invention (Exploring Ideas #1 p. 40)

HW:

Reading: CEL Ch. 2 pp. 43 – 48Tocknell, “That’s What We’re Doing Here” (BB)
Writing: RL 2: On BB, respond to the questions posted on the corresponding discussion board. Respond to at least one other person’s response.
F 08/31 Library/Writing Center/Speaking Center Orientation: meet in foyer of Cook Library at the beginning of class (TENTATIVE)

HW:

Reading: Bosley, “How I Lost the Junior Miss Pageant (CEL 33-35) and Jacobs “The Truth About Nakedness” (BB)
Writing: RL 3: On the discussion board for this reading, answer Exploring Ideas #2-3 p. 36. Respond to at least one other person’s post.

Week Three

M 09/03 LABOR DAY HOLIDAY—NO CLASS
W 09/05 Discuss “How I Lost the Junior Miss Pageant,” “The Truth About Nakedness” and “Analysis” 

HW:

Reading: CEL Ch. 2 pp. 49 – 51Nafisi, excerpt from Reading Lolita in Tehran
Writing: RL 4: On BB, answer the questions on the Reading Lolita discussion board. Respond to at least one other person’s post.
F 09/07 Discuss Reading Lolita in Tehran; In-class invention exercises and discussions of theses

HW:

Reading: CEL Ch. 2 pp. 52 – 53Tengelitsch “The Greatest Gift” (pp. 532 – 534)
Writing: Sketch #1: Introduction (one page typed)

Week Four

M 09/10 Discuss “The Greatest Gift” and “Rhetorical Tools”; Workshop introductions

HW:

Reading:Writing: CEL Ch. 2 pp. 54 – 59Begin drafting Project One; bring draft to class
W 09/12 Discuss “Organization Strategies,” “Writer’s Voice,” and “Vitality”; Discuss student drafts

HW:

Writing: CEL Ch. 2 pp. 60 – 62Draft #1 (full-length, typed, and printed)
F 09/14 Discuss “Peer Review” and “Delivery”; Workshop Project One

HW:

Writing: Revise Project One; Prepare Draft #2 (full-length, typed, and printed)

Week Five

M 09/17 Workshop Project One; Style workshop

HW:

Writing: Revise Project One
W 09/19 PROJECT ONE DUE; Decompression

HW:

Reading: CEL Ch. 4 pp. 100 – 101Hebdige, “Subculture: The Meaning of Style” (BB)  (Will be discussed 9/26)

“WCU How to write a profile” (BB) – print and bring to class on Monday

F 09/21 Library Day: Using databases to find sample profile essays (Meet in LIB 110) – TENTATIVE

HW:

Reading: Use the library databases to locate a sample profile essay; read the profile and bring it to class Monday
Writing: RL 5: (on BB) Did you find the portrayal of the subject interesting?  In what ways did the author attempt to draw you into the story?  What were the most interesting details?  What techniques or styles might you use in your own profile essay?

Week Six

M 09/24 Discuss “Observing” and “Writing Profiles”; Discuss students’ sample essays

HW:

Reading: Palahniuk, “Where Meat Comes From” (BB)Murphy “Tips for a Good Profile Piece” (BB – YouTube video)
Writing: RL 6: On BB, answer the questions on the corresponding discussion board. Reply to at least one other response.
W 09/26 Discuss “Subculture,”“Where Meat Comes From” and “Tips”; Read and discuss “Point of Contact” p. 114

HW:

Reading:Writing: McNamara “General Guidelines for Conducting Research Interviews”“Don’t Call Me a National Treasure” (BB)

Sketch #1: Develop interview questions

F 09/28 Meet in the Speaking Center for interview questions workshop

HW:

Reading:Writing: “Badlands: Portrait of a Competitive Eater” (BB)Revise interview questions and schedule your interview

RL 7: Make a list of the descriptions of Badlands’ physical appearance and/or behavior you found most interesting.  What impression did these descriptions create?

Week Seven

M 10/01 Discuss and “Badlands,” “Don’t Call Me…”; Read and discuss “Analysis” pp. 116-117

HW:

Reading:Writing: CEL pp. 118-119Sketch #2: Respond to the Invention Questions on p. 116 and the Public Resonance Questions on p. 118
W 10/03 Discuss “Public Resonance”; Discuss student sketches; Discuss sample student profile essays on BB

HW:

Reading:Writing: Palahniuk, “Demolition” (BB)RL 8: On BB, respond to the questions on the discussion board.
F 10/05 Discuss “Demolition”; In-class writing

HW:

Writing: Sketch #3: Bring typed interview notes to class Monday for group workshop

Week Eight

M 10/08 Sketch workshop: moving from Q&A to narrative

HW:

Reading: CEL pp. 120 – 125
Writing:  Draft #1: At least two pages, typed and printed
W 10/10 Discuss “Thesis,” “Rhetorical Tools,” and “Organizational Strategies”; Workshop drafts

HW:

Reading: CEL pp. 126 – 131
Writing: Draft #2: Full-length, typed and printed
F 10/12 FALL BREAK—NO CLASS

Week Nine

M 10/15                  Workshop drafts; Style workshop on quotations
                                              HW: Reading: CEL pp. 132 – 133
Writing: Revise Project Two
W 10/17                PROJECT TWO DUE; Decompression; Introduce Peer Evaluation
                                              HW: Writing: Peer Evaluation
F 10/19 Peer Evaluation DUE

                                              HW:

Reading: CEL Ch. 6 pp. 170 – 171;Davis “The Power of Images” (pp. 568 – 571)

Week Ten

M 10/22 Discuss Analyzing Images and “The Power of Images”; Introduce Project Two

HW:

Reading: CEL Ch. 6 pp. 186 – 187Thoman “Rise of the Image Culture” (pp. 172 – 176)
Writing: RL 9: Respond to Writing Strategies #1-5 p. 176
W 10/24 Discuss “Rise of the Image Culture”; Discuss “Point of Contact”

HW:

Reading: Johnson “The Mighty Image” (pp. 177 – 180)
Writing: RL 10: Exploring Ideas #2 p. 180
F 10/26 Discuss “The Mighty Image”; In-class writing

HW:

Reading: CEL Ch. 6 pp. 188 – 195

Week Eleven

M 10/29 Meet in Writing Studio (LAB 334) to work with images; bring laptop if you have one

HW:

Writing: Select at least three images you consider interesting and bring them to class in print or on your laptop.RL 11:  Discuss why you chose each image.
W 10/31 Discuss student images; Discuss analysis; In-class analysis

HW:

Writing: RL 12:  Select the text you will analyze for project two and respond thoroughly to the invention questions on p. 191.
F 11/02 STUDENT CONFERENCES

HW:

Reading:  CEL Ch. 6 pp. 196 – 197Clough “Cartoons ‘n Comics” (pp. 566 – 568)

Week Twelve

M 11/05 Discuss “Cartoons ‘n Comics”; Discuss “Thesis”; In-class writing

HW:

Reading:Writing: CEL Ch. 6 pp. 198 – 201 Hollingsworth “An Imperfect Reality” (pp. 181 – 183)

RL 13: Respond to Writing Strategies p. 183 #1-3

Begin drafting Project Two

W 11/07 Discuss “An Imperfect Reality”; Discuss “Rhetorical Tools,” and “Organizational Strategies”

HW:

Reading: CEL Ch. 6 pp. 202 – 205
Writing: Develop Sketch #2 with a working thesis and evidence (one page, typed)
F 11/09 Discuss “Writer’s Voice” and “Vitality”; Discuss student sketches

HW:

Writing: Draft #1: At least two pages, typed, and printed)

Week Thirteen

M 11/12 Discuss “Peer Review” and “Delivery”; Invention Workshop (p. 206); Writing Center workshop preparation

HW:

Writing: Prepare/exchange/read drafts for workshop
W 11/14 Meet in Writing Center for workshop – DATE TENTATIVE

HW:

Writing: Draft #2: Full-length, typed and printed
F 11/16 Draft workshop; Style workshop

HW:

 Writing: Revise draft

Week Fourteen

M 11/19 PROJECT 3 DUE; Decompression; Begin discussing Final Portfolio

HW:

Reading: Begin reading through your essays for this class and making notes
W 11/21 THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY—NO CLASS
F 11/23

THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY—NO CLASS

Week Fifteen

M 11/26 Introduce Final Portfolio Project

HW:

Writing: RL 14: Revision Plan
W 11/28 Student conferences
F 11/30 Student conferences

Week Sixteen

M 12/03 Discuss revision strategies; Discuss self-assessment

HW:

Writing: Revise essay and begin composing self-assessment
W 12/05 Workshop Final Portfolios

HW:

Writing: Continue revising essays and self-assessment
F 12/07 Workshop Final Portfolios

HW:

Writing: Final Portfolios DUE Exam Week

Final Portfolios Due: TBA

Introduction to World Literature

COURSE DESCRIPTION

As explained in the university’s course description, English 203—World Literature—aims to

“[a]cquaint students with significant figures and works of world literature.” This class aims to introduce you not only to literary anaylsis and the ways we read literature, but the influences that global cultures have upon society as a whole. This class seeks to explore literature not only from the United States, but from societies and cultures across the globe; you will discover writing from a diverse selection of locations, and a diversity of forms.

Keep in mind that literature is a very broad field of study. Thus, consider this course an introduction. Rather than taking a chronological approach, we will instead be discussing texts thematically—what unites Anne Moody’s Coming of Age in Mississippi with Shakespeare’s Othello for instance? The key to succeeding in this class is to keep an open mind and continue to question.

REQUIRED MATERIALS

  • Iglesias, Luis A., Michael Mays, and Linda M. Pierce. Allen. Global Crossroads: A World Literature Reader. Southlake, TX: Fountainhead, 2008. Print.
  • Moore, Alan, and Dave Gibbons. Watchmen. New York: DC Comics, 1995. Print.
  • Satrapi, Marjane. The Complete Persepolis. New York: Pantheon, 2007. Print.
  • 3-ring notebook for notes and journal entries
  • Ability to print supplementary materials (you will be given ample notice when/what to print).

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

1)      Students will demonstrate the ability to connect ideas in a coherent essay; students will demonstrate the ability to connect course content to other disciplines and/or to real world situations.

2)      Students will demonstrate the ability to develop and focus on one topic in writing assignments and present ideas in an organized, logical, coherent form; students will demonstrate the ability to use Standard English grammar, punctuation, spelling and usage.

3)      Students will demonstrate an understanding of the influence of art, music, literature, theatre or dance on culture. Students will demonstrate an appreciation for art, music, literature, theatre and/or dance.

4)      Students will demonstrate the ability to write an analytical essay, the ability to find and cite relevant sources, and the ability to analyze the components of an argument.

5)      Students will be able to explain the implications of familial, sexual or religious diversity among individuals, will be able to discuss (in speaking or writing) major developments in world history, and will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the literary and creative contributions of world cultures.

REQUIREMENTS

In order to receive at least a “C” grade in this course, you must satisfactorily complete all of the following:

  • complete all major writing projects;
  • complete group presentation;
  • complete all tests and quizzes;
  • complete all question paper assignments;
  • complete all reading assignments and homework, actively participate in class discussions and workshops, and maintain regular classroom attendance.

COURSE POLICIES

 GRADES

The following should serve as a guide to how grading will be approached:

Question Papers & Reading Quizzes (10 points)

For each day’s reading, you will prepare 10 discussion questions, then choose one on which to write a response. Your response should be one full typed page, single spaced. Response papers will be collected at the end of each class. Reading quizzes will be given on an occasional basis, and will be unannounced.

Literary Soundtrack Essay (15 points)

A 3-4 page essay creating a soundtrack for a particular work and explaining your song choices.

Due in class February 18.

 

Creative Project (10 points)

You (and a partner, if you so choose) will create a visual interpretation of Gilgamesh.

Due April 8.

Midterm Exam (15 points)

The midterm will be an in-class exam consisting of short answer and identification questions.

Final Exam (20 points)

The final exam will consist of short answer and identification questions, as well as one essay. It will be cumulative, but will mostly concentrate on material covered after the midterm.

Literary Themes Analysis Essay (20 pts)

You will write one 4-6 page paper that analyzes how two texts we are studying this semester connect thematically. The paper will be due April 24. The paper should adhere to MLA formatting guidelines and include a Works Cited page.

Class Participation/Homework (10 pts)

You are expected to contribute to class discussions; participate in group work; etc. At minimum, I expect that you will be an active listener in class discussions and will say something at least once per class meeting. Participation points will be taken off for texting while in class, using your computer/other electronic device for non-class related purposes, sleeping in class, completing work for another class, or other kinds of not staying on task.

PREPARATION

In addition to completing reading and writing assignments, preparing for class means being ready to discuss and intelligently question issues raised by the material. This does not mean, however, that you must master the material. On the contrary, it is perfectly reasonable that you may be confused by some readings the first time we encounter them. But in such cases you should be prepared to discuss what you specifically found puzzling, aggravating, thought-provoking, engaging, or difficult about the assignment. In other words, if you feel you have nothing to state about a piece of writing, actively develop a list of questions about it.

ATTENDANCE

The framework of this course – with its emphasis on class discussion and group work – demands that you attend class regularly. Failure to complete in-class work will result in the lowering of your grade. Indeed, no in-class activities (including quizzes) may be made up due to tardiness or absence.

Your attendance is absolutely necessary. Each student will be allowed two (2) absences without penalty. There is no difference between “excused” and “unexcused” absences, therefore please plan accordingly. After the second absence each additional absence will result in your final grade being reduced by one full letter. Thus, with three absences an “A” becomes a “B;” with four absences an “A” becomes a “C,” with five absences an “A” becomes a “D,” and so on. You are also required to show up on time; if you are up to15 minutes late you will be marked tardy, which will count as one third of an absence. Three tardies and/or early departures will equal one absence. Any more than 15 minutes late and you will be marked absent for that class session. Please remember that attendance is important. You are responsible for keeping track of your own absences.

CLASSROOM CONDUCT/SOCIAL JUSTICE

I expect all students to help maintain a positive learning environment based upon open communication, mutual respect, and non-discrimination. While all points of view are welcome, hurtful and biased comments and language will not be tolerated. Please be respectful of others’ points of view (including those we will be reading in class), cultures, and experiences. Any suggestions as to how to further a positive and open environment in this class will be appreciated and given serious consideration.

LATE WORK

Late work will only be accepted if you can demonstrate that you have encountered a valid obstacle before the deadline (i.e., that you’ve been working on the project in good faith, but have run into some problems). If you feel you may be unable to complete an assignment on time, you should contact me as soon as possible, but no later than two days before the due date. After reviewing all the work you’ve done on the assignment, we will set a new deadline together. In all other cases, late work will automatically be docked one letter grade per day past the deadline, beginning the day the assignment was due.

Note: Unless specified otherwise, no papers submitted electronically will be accepted, and work magically appearing in my mailbox without a prior agreement with me will also be considered late.

PORTABLE ELECTRONIC DEVICES

It is important to me that we maintain a positive, engaging, and professional atmosphere in the classroom. Cell phones must be turned off  and put away during class (unless you have a legitimate reason—a young child or an ill parent/grandparent, for example—for keeping it on, which you have cleared with me before class). Please DO NOT check or send text messages or emails; if you do so, you WILL GET A ZERO for participation points and, in certain cases, may be asked to leave class and take an absence for the day. All other electronic devices (including music devices) should be turned off before coming to class; please remove any earpieces as well. You may bring your laptop or e-reader to class in order to view the PDF reading assignments. Electronic devices should remain in your bag unless you make prior arrangements; if you want to use such devices you must read and sign the “Electronics Agreement” at the end of the syllabus and return it to me before you use your device.

PLAGIARISM

All members of the academic community at the University of Southern Mississippi are expected to take responsibility for academic honesty and integrity. Plagiarism – the willful copying/presenting of another person’s work as if it were your own – and other forms of cheating are unacceptable. The penalties for such behavior can include being failed for the course and in some cases even expulsion from the university. If you have any doubts as to what constitutes plagiarism, please refer to your student handbook for USM policies on Academic Honesty, visit the Cook Library’s site on avoiding plagiarism (http://www.lib.usm.edu/help/how_do_i_faq/help_faq/how_do_i_learn_more_about_plagiarism.html,), or come talk to me.

ADA NOTICE

The University of Southern Mississippi is committed to providing equal access to its programs, services and activities for people with disabilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act requires that reasonable accommodations be provided for students with physical, sensory, cognitive, systemic, learning, and psychiatric disabilities. If you feel you may need accommodations in this or any class, please contact the Office of Disability Services (118 College Dr. #8586, Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001) at 601-266-5024 (Telephone), 601-266-6837 (TTY), or 601-266-6035 (FAX).

THE WRITING CENTER

The Writing Center is a free program available to all student writers at the University of Southern Mississippi. It offers one-on-one help with any kind of writing project, at any stage of the writing process. The Writing Center is located in Cook Library 112.  The Writing Center will play an important role in the design of this course.  For more information, and hours of operation, you may contact The Writing Center at 601-266-4821, or visit the website at: http://www.usm.edu/writingcenter/.

THE SPEAKING CENTER

The University of Southern Mississippi offers a Speaking Center, with consultations available at no cost to all students, faculty, and staff.  The center is available for advice on all types of oral communication—formal individual presentations, group presentations, class discussion, class debates, interviews, campus speeches, etc.  Tutors at the Speaking Center will work with you on brainstorming, organizing and outlining, editing and revising, and practicing delivery.  The center also offers several practice rooms for recording presentations and practicing with delivery aids (PowerPoint and internet access are available).  Visit the center in Cook Library 117, call the center at 601-266-4965, or visit the website at www.usm.edu/speakingcenter.

Schedule

All assignments and due dates are subject to change at my discretion.

GC=Global Crossroads

Week One

1/16 Welcome, syllabus, getting started.

1/18 Coming of Age in Mississippi  Introduction through Chapter 11 (GC pages 387-423)

Week Two

1/21 MLK HOLIDAY—NO CLASS

1/23 Coming of Age in Mississippi Chapter 12-end (GC pages 424-488)

Week Three

1/28 “Grandmother’s Letters” (GC 164-176) and writing about literature

1/30 Selections from the Qu’ran (GC pages 73-83)

Week Four

2/4 Persepolis Book One: The Story of a Childhood

2/6 Persepolis  Book Two: The Story of a Return

Week Five

2/11 MARDI GRAS HOLIDAY—NO CLASS

2/13 “Persepolis 2.0” and “Requiem” (on Blackboard)

Week Six

2/18 Heart of Darkness Introduction through Chapter II (GC pages 271-318) ESSAY #1 DUE

2/20 Heart of Darkness Chapter III through end (GC pages 319-341).

Week Seven

2/25 Midterm Review

2/27 Midterm Exam

Week Eight

3/4 Watch Apocalypse Now

3/6 Watch Apocalypse Now

Week Nine

3/11 SPRING BREAK—NO CLASS

3/13 SPRING BREAK—NO CLASS

Week Ten

3/18 Vietnamese poets (on Blackboard)

3/20 “Masako’s Story” and “Moonlight Shadow” (on Blackboard)

Week Eleven

3/25 Cross-cultural flood stories (on Blackboard)

3/27 Gilgamesh Introduction through Tablet IX (GC pages 1-53)

Week Twelve

4/1 Gilgamesh Tablet X through end (GC pages 53-72)

4/3 Watchmen

Week Thirteen

4/8 Watchmen

4/10 Othello  Introduction and Act I (GC pages 505-533) CREATIVE PROJECT DUE

Week Fourteen

4/15 Othello Acts 2-4 (GC pages 533-617)

4/17 Othello Act 5 (GC pages 617-639)

Week Fifteen

4/22 Electra (read full play, GC pages 647-702)

4/24 Electra ESSAY #2 DUE

Week Sixteen

4/29 Something fun, TBA

5/1 Course wrap up, final exam review.

Final exam Monday, May 6, 1:30-4 p.m.

Language-Themed English 101 Course

ENG 101: Composition I

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

English 101 introduces students to some of the strategies, tools, and resources necessary to becoming successful communicators in a range of academic, professional, and public settings.  English 101 students learn not only to think carefully through writing, but also to reflect critically about writing by engaging a variety of discursive forms, from the academic essay to opinion pieces, from essays to advertisements.

This semester, our class will be focused broadly around the idea of language. We will explore how language both shapes and is shaped by the world in which we live through readings about language and culture, identity, literacies, education, family, and slang (among other topics). We will talk about the rules for Standard Academic English (as well as questioning who gets to make those rules and what their implications are) and look for models of language in the work of other writers, as well as exploring how language is used in our everyday lives beyond the composition classroom.

REQUIRED MATERIALS

  • Lunsford, Andrea, et al. Everyone’s an Author with Readings. New York: Norton, 2012.
  • Blackboard Supplemental Readings
  • A notebook OR a laptop/tablet for taking notes during class.
  • Paper and pen for in-class writing assignments
  • A dedicated notebook for your journal OR a laptop/tablet with journal entries in a single Word file.

ONLINE ACCESS

To access the online components of this course, you must first go to https://usm.blackboard.com, then follow the log-in instructions. You will need to have your EMPLID and password (the same information you use to access SOAR and register for classes). If you have any questions or run into difficulty accessing the Blackboard material for this course, please call the iTech Help Desk at 601-266-4357 or helpdesk@usm.edu. You can also get specific instructions on how to use components of Blackboard by visiting www.usm.edu/elo.

I also strongly suggest, but do not require, an account with an online cloud storage system, such as Dropbox or Google Drive, to store your class writings and essay drafts. This eliminates the danger of computer crashes and lost jump drives, and ensures that nothing you write will be permanently lost. These services are free, and easy to use.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

ENG 101 is a GEC-required course at USM, and students taking this course are expected to meet the following GEC learning outcomes:

 

  1. the student is able to develop a topic and present ideas through writing in an organized, logical, and coherent form and in a style that is appropriate for the discipline and the situation.
  2. the student can observe conventions of Standard English grammar, punctuation, spelling, and usage.
  3. the student can  write a coherent analytical essay [considering the] rhetorical situation or through written communication effectively analyze the components of an argument.
  4. the student can find, use, and cite relevant information.

In order assist students in meeting these GEC learning outcomes, the Composition Program at Southern Miss has identified specific learning outcomes for each of its first-year writing courses that are meant to complement the GEC outcomes.  At the completion of ENG 101, students will be able to:

  • See that writing is a form of social interaction;
  • Analyze rhetorical situations and make effective choices based on audience and context;
  • Responsibly synthesize material from a variety of sources;
  • Make claims and support them with appropriate evidence;
  • Use writing to critically explore, explain, evaluate, and reflect on their experiences and on those of others;
  • Understand and effectively use a range of genres/forms;
  • Use conventions of expression appropriate to situation and audience;
  • Effectively revise and provide substantive feedback to others on their writing;
  • Articulate a revision strategy based on an understanding of their own writing processes;
  • Recognize the importance of technology in research, writing, and other forms of social interaction.

 

REQUIREMENTS

In order to receive at least a “C” grade in this course, you must satisfactorily complete all of the following:

  • complete all major writing projects;
  • complete the final portfolio project, to be submitted at the end of the semester (in lieu of a final exam);
  • maintain a language journal that relates to our course readings and discussions;
  • complete all reading assignments and homework, actively participate in class discussions and workshops, and maintain regular classroom attendance.

COURSE POLICIES

GRADES

Writing and thinking are complex processes that take time to develop. Thus, your overall grade for English 101 is as dependent on how much your writing improves over the course of the semester, your demonstrated commitment to learning and support of your peers, the careful completion of homework and class assignments, and your own assessment of your strengths and progress, as any strict calculation of paper grades. Indeed, a portion of your final grade for this course will be determined by your Final Portfolio Project, which you will submit at the end of the semester. The following should serve only as a guide for how grading will be approached:

Project One: Literacy Narrative (10%)

A brief paper (3-5 pages) in which you will analyze and reflect on a moment in your life that involves your literacy development and make it relevant to an outside audience.

Project Two: Analytical Report (15%)

A longer paper (4-6 pages) in which you will report on and analyze a person, place, or community for an audience outside of that community.

Project Three: Analytical Argument Portfolio (30%)

A three-part assignment that asks you to develop an academic summary (5 pts), an analytical response (15 pts), and an argument essay (20 pts) utilizing course readings revolving around language.

Class Participation (5%)

Participation:  Your contributions to class discussions; your participation in collaborative assignments; participation in peer review workshops; and completion of assigned readings.

Informal Writing Assignments (10%)

Language Journal:  Because we will be looking critically at ideas of language, you will keep a language journal over the course of this semester. This journal exists in two parts, as a handwritten or typed personal journal, and as an individual blog on Blackboard:

  1. For each reading, you will choose a section of the text (a sentence or two) that you feel is particularly well-written. You will copy it into your journal, then write a few sentences exploring why this piece of writing works—examining its organization, structure, rhythm, word choice, and so on. Finally, you will write an imitation of this section using your own words and ideas. You are required to write one of these entries for one essay or article from each day’s reading (but not explanatory textbook chapters).
  1. Throughout the semester, you will look at the wider world—blogs, news articles, advertisements, your friends’ and families’ conversations, and so on—to consider how you and others use language, and post blog entries about the language you encounter outside the classroom. These entries (200-400 words) should record the language in question (I encourage you to consider using audio/video recordings and photographs), and critically reflect on how the language around you fits in with course readings and discussions. Over the course of the semester, you are required to write a minimum of ten of these entries, and to write thoughtful responses to your classmates’ blogs. In addition, you will occasionally be assigned specific topics for your blog posts. You get two free “passes” for assigned journal entries per semester—use them wisely.

I will collect your imitation journals at announced points in the semester for grading (if you choose to type yours, you’ll need to print them out), as well as asking you to share entries during most class days.

Final Portfolio Project (30 pts)

Two papers, one systematically revised and the other polished, as well as completion of the reflective essay assignment, which will ask you to critically reflect on and discuss nearly every aspect of your work for this course.

Note: For program assessment purposes, some final portfolios may be randomly selected for institutional review at the conclusion of the semester. In such cases, portfolios will be collected anonymously from among all available sections of English 101. This review is intended solely to improve the quality of the curriculum and will not affect your grade in any way.

 

PREPARATION

In addition to completing all reading and writing assignments, preparing for class means being ready to discuss and intelligently question issues raised by the material. This does not mean, however, that you must master the material. On the contrary, it is perfectly reasonable that you may be confused by some readings the first time we encounter them. But in such cases you should be prepared to discuss what you specifically found puzzling, aggravating, thought-provoking, engaging, or difficult about the assignment. In other words, if you feel you have nothing to state about a piece of writing, you should actively develop a list of questions about it. Remember, much of your grade in this course will be determined by how much you improve over the course of the semester, so there is really no such thing as a stupid question, provided that you ask it in the spirit of honest inquiry.

ACTIVE PARTICIPATION

Being physically present in class is not enough; you must also be mentally present.  Sleeping, engaging in distracting behaviors (such as interrupting discussions, texting, playing on social media, doing work for other classes, etc.), or refusing to participate in class activities and discussions is unacceptable and is grounds for being counted absent.  If you have a hard time staying awake, concentrating, or sitting still at your desk, you may stand up or move around, provided you do so in a non-distracting way.

ATTENDANCE

The framework of this course – with its emphasis on class discussion and group work – demands that you attend class regularly. Failure to complete in-class work, such as peer reviews, in-class writing assignments, and group meetings will result in the lowering of your overall grade. Indeed, no in-class activities (including quizzes) may be made up due to tardiness or absence, and students who accumulate more than two absences over the course of the semester will automatically have their final grades lowered by up to one full letter grade for each additional absence. More than four absences in a semester will result in failing the course. There are no distinctions between excused and unexcused absences, so use your allotted days wisely. You are responsible for keeping track of your own attendance record. If you have a legitimate emergency, you must contact me within 24 hours of missing class to make arrangements for missed assignments.

 

TARDY POLICY

Please plan to arrive on time and stay for the entire length of the class. If you arrive more than five minutes after the beginning of class, you will be considered late, and I will also note early departures. Four late arrivals or early departures will count as one absence. If you arrive more than fifteen minutes late or leave more than fifteen minutes early (without prior approval from me), you will be counted absent.

 

LATE WORK

Late work will only be accepted if you can demonstrate that you have encountered a valid obstacle before the deadline (i.e., that you’ve been working on the project in good faith, but have run into some problems). If you feel you may be unable to complete an assignment on time, you should contact me as soon as possible, but no later than two days before the due date. After reviewing all the work you’ve done on the assignment, we will set a new deadline together. In all other cases, late work will automatically be docked one letter grade per day past the deadline, beginning on the day the assignment was due and including weekends.

Note: All major papers will be turned in through Blackboard this semester, and due by 5 p.m. on the due date. I will explain the procedure for using the technology in class, but it is YOUR responsibility to ensure that your work is properly uploaded and readable. I will not accept papers submitted via email or hard copies of work magically appearing in my English department mailbox without a prior agreement.

PORTABLE ELECTRONIC DEVICES

Students are encouraged to utilize portable electronic devices (such as tablets and laptops) for constructive purposes.  Students who choose to use these devices for our electronic readings must show evidence of annotation and analysis via an annotation program (iAnnotate, Good Reader, etc.). Texting, checking email and social media sites, gaming, listening to music, doing work for other classes/purposes, and other distracting uses of technology are unacceptable. Unless you are using your smartphone for class purposes, phones must be turned off  and put away during class (unless you have a legitimate reason—a young child for whom you are an emergency contact or an ill parent/grandparent, for example—for keeping it on, which you have cleared with me before class). If I notice that you are using technology in an inappropriate way, I will not (further) distract the class by pointing it out, but I will deduct a point from your final average for each infraction. In some cases, you will be asked to leave class and take an absence for the day.

PLAGIARISM

All members of the academic community at the University of Southern Mississippi are expected to take responsibility for academic honesty and integrity. Plagiarism – the willful copying/presenting of another person’s work as if it were your own – and other forms of cheating are unacceptable. The penalties for such behavior can include failure of the course and, in some cases, even expulsion from the university. If you have any doubts about what constitutes plagiarism, please refer to your student handbook, to USM policies on Academic Honesty, or come talk to me.

EMAIL AND ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATION ETIQUETTE

We will do most of our writing in digital spaces—some formal, some informal. As we will discuss throughout the semester, different spaces and situations require different styles of communication. An informal message to a classmate, for example, may be casual in style and tone, while a polished project should have a style and tone appropriate for an academic audience. An important part of learning to be a successful student and writer is knowing what is appropriate in a given situation. As a way to practice professional email etiquette (a skill you will need in most situations in the future), an email to me, to any other faculty or staff member on campus, or to anyone in any position of authority must be respectful and professional in tone, should come from your official USM email account, and should follow this format:

Subject: Request to schedule an appointment *A subject line is always required and should clearly and briefly represent your purpose for emailing. Emails with no subject line may not be read.

Dear Ms. Rothenbeck, *Always use a formal address, such as Professor, Dr., Ms., Mr. Never use the person’s first name unless you have been given explicit permission to do so.

I am a student in your ENG 101 H01E class, and I would like to schedule an appointment with you in your office to discuss my draft of the argument essay. I am having trouble with my thesis statement and hope to get your help in clarifying it. Are you available to meet this Wednesday afternoon? *State your question, concern, or request briefly and clearly, using standardized English. Maintain a polite, respectful tone and avoid using exclamation points, emoticons, texting abbreviations, or coarse language. Avoid asking questions that are answered on the syllabus or assignment sheet, such as “When is our paper due?” or “What is our homework for tomorrow?” Emails that are not professional in style or tone, or that ask questions that are clearly answered on the syllabus or assignment sheets, may be ignored.

Thank you, *Use a formal closing, such as “Sincerely,” “Respectfully,” “Thank you,” or “Best regards.”

Kim Jones *Always sign your full name at the end of your email.

ADA NOTICE

The University of Southern Mississippi is committed to providing equal access to its programs, services, and activities for people with disabilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act requires that reasonable accommodations be provided for students with physical, sensory, cognitive, systemic, learning, and psychiatric disabilities. If you feel you may need accommodations in this or any class, please contact the Office of Disability Services (118 College Dr. #8586, Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001) at 601-266-5024 (Telephone), 601-266-6837 (TTY), or 601-266-6035 (FAX).

 

THE WRITING CENTER

The Writing Center is a free program available to all student writers at the University of Southern Mississippi. It offers one-on-one help with any kind of writing project, at any stage of the writing process. The Writing Center is located in Cook Library 112.  The Writing Center will play an important role in the design of this course.  For more information, and hours of operation, you may contact The Writing Center at 601-266-4821, or visit the website at: http://www.usm.edu/writingcenter/.

THE SPEAKING CENTER

The University of Southern Mississippi offers a Speaking Center, with consultations available at no cost to all students, faculty, and staff.  The center is available for advice on all types of oral communication—formal individual presentations, group presentations, class discussion, class debates, interviews, campus speeches, etc.  Tutors at the Speaking Center will work with you on brainstorming, organizing and outlining, editing and revising, and practicing delivery.  The center also offers several practice rooms for recording presentations and practicing with delivery aids (PowerPoint and internet access are available).  Visit the center in Cook Library 117, call the center at 601-266-4965, or visit the website at www.usm.edu/speakingcenter.

 

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE

EAA: Everyone’s an Author

BB: Blackboard Readings

*This schedule is subject to change at my discretion. I will notify you in class of any changes.

Week 1

8/22       Introductions/Writing Sample   

 

Week 2

8/27       EAA “Thinking Rhetorically”; “Rhetorical Situations”; “Writing Processes”; “The Need for                Collaboration”; BB “Six Things You Should Say to Your Professor”;  “Guidelines for Discussion”          (handout)

8/29       EAA “Writing a Narrative”; “Literacy: A Lineage”; “The Sanctuary of School”; “Compulsory Reading”         

 

Week 3

9/3         EAA “Blue-Collar Brilliance”; “Moving from Social Media to Academic Writing”

9/5         BB Ann Lamott “Shitty First Drafts” (excerpt); Mike Rose “Lives on the Boundary” (excerpt)

Week 4

9/10       BB Richard Rodriguez “Aria”; BB Amy Tan “Mother Tongue” (excerpt)

9/12       Project 1 Draft DUE; Peer Workshops

Week 5

9/17       Project 1 DUE; Decompression

Introduce Analytical Report—Language and College; EAA “Reporting Information”

9/19       EAA “Collecting Field Research”;               BB “The Power of Slang”; “Do You Speak College Slang?”

 

Week 6

9/24       BB “Bros Get Wasted, Girls Get Tipsy”; “Now I Gotta Watch What I Say,” ;“Jeah! We Mapped Out            The 4 Basic Aspects Of Being A ‘Bro’;

9/26       EAA “Synthesizing Ideas”; “Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing” ; BB “ Sex on Campus: She               Can Play That Game, Too” ; “Advice for the Young Women of Princeton”; “Media Coverage of      the Post Title IX Female Athlete”

 

Week 7

10/1       EAA “Tweets to Reports”; BB “Bathroom Graffiti at Humboldt State”; “Bathroom Graffiti and the              Overarching Implications for Social and Historical Analysis”(Prezi presentation); “Pompeii ‘Wall             Posts’ Reveal Ancient Social Networks”

10/2       Last day to drop without academic penalty

10/3       Field Research Presentations

Week 8

10/8       Field Research Presentations; Writing Workshops/Introductions

10/10     Field Research Presentations; Developing your case study

 

Week 9

10/15     Project 2 Draft DUE; Peer Workshops

10/17     No Class—Fall Break

 

Week 10

10/22     Project 2 DUE; Decompression; Introduce Project 3; Discuss Summary; Introduce Analytical         Argument Portfolio—Language and Identity

10/24     BB “The Quare Gene”; “My Yiddish”

10/25 Midterm grades due

 

Week 11

10/29     Academic Summary Draft DUE; Peer Workshop; BB “You Are the Second Person”; “The Grammar of       Urban African American Vernacular English”

10/31     Academic Summary DUE; “Nobody Mean More to Me Than You”; “Language on               Trial” (NPR audio              clip)

Week 12

11/5       BB “A New Gender-Neutral Pronoun in Baltimore, Maryland: A Preliminary Study;” “Nuances of gay       identities reflected in new language”

11/7       “The 11 Differences of Dating a Boy vs. a Man”; “Reclaiming Critical Analysis: The Social Harms of               ‘Bitch’”

Week 13 

11/12     Analytical Response DUE

11/14     BB “Writing on the Bias”; “Not Too Late to Take the Sanitation Test”

Week 14 

11/19     In-class writing workshops

11/21     Analytical Argument Draft DUE

 

Week 15

11/26     Analytical Argument DUE; Decompression; Introduce Project 4

11/28     No class—Thanksgiving Holidays

 

Week 16

12/3       EAA “Assembling a Portfolio”; Portfolio Workshops

12/5       Portfolio Workshops

Exam Week

Final Portfolios DUE